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Nest Watch: Feathered Fun with Community Science

July 2022 

By Charlotte Hood, Volunteer and Outreach Assistant 

Watching eggs hatch and baby birds grow for science? Yup! This is BNRC’s first season participating in Cornell’s Lab of Ornithology NestWatch program, and what fun it has been!  

NestWatch is a nationwide program designed to track the status and trends in the reproductive biology of birds, including the timing of nesting, number of eggs laid, how many eggs hatch, and how many hatchlings survive. The data participants help collect is used to study the condition of bird populations and how they may be changing over time due to environmental stressors such as climate change and habitat loss. Given that there has been a nearly 30% reduction in the North American bird population since 1970, research like this has never been so important (Rosenberg et al, 2019).  

Among the volunteer participants was a family of homeschoolers who were quite literally doing this for science (class!). They braved the chilly spring and muddy trail, and it paid off, opening their box one day to find these beautiful eastern bluebird eggs and then a few days later, naked nestlings!

    
    

Another participant battled a pesky and persistent field mouse who kept returning to the nest box to make its home. Perhaps it confused itself for a bird? Thankfully, this dedicated volunteer was just as persistent and found a different nest box with a tree swallow nest. Tree swallow nests are easily distinguished from eastern bluebird nests by the feathers that characterize their nesting material. Additionally, tree swallow eggs are pinkish white, quite different from the eastern bluebird’s turquoise (see photos). 

 As we near the end of July, adult tree swallows and their fledglings are gearing up for their southern migration to overwintering sites in Florida and Central America, an early trip for songbirds. Meanwhile, eastern bluebirds are attempting a second and sometimes even a third brood, not migrating south until later in the season.  

If you don’t have the time to participate in NestWatch you can make a difference by building your own nest box. Tree swallows and eastern bluebirds use the same nest box, so you can attract both species to your property and support their reproduction. See All About Birdhouses for more details and a free, downloadable construction plan.  

By participating in NestWatch, BNRC was able to offer the public a new way of interacting with the natural world – an intimate window into the life of birds, and the chance to make a difference. For kids and adults alike, NestWatch offers a beginner-friendly introduction to the biology of birds and data collection and allows land trusts like BNRC to broaden our sphere of influence.  

Are you interested in participating or learning more? Send an email to Charlotte at chood@bnrc.org or visit NestWatch online.

 Reference 

Rosenberg KV, Dokter AM, Blancher PJ, Sauer JR, Smith AC, Smith PA, Stanton JC, Panjabi A, Helft L, Parr M, Marra PP. Decline of the North American avifauna. Science. 2019 Oct 4;366(6461):120-124. doi: 10.1126/science.aaw1313. Epub 2019 Sep 19. PMID: 31604313. 

https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/DECLINE-OF-NORTH-AMERICAN-AVIFAUNA-SCIENCE-2019.pdf 

Your 2022 Spring newsyletter!

June 3, 2022

For those of you not signed up to receive BNRC’s “Newsyletters,” or for those wondering what a newsyletter is, these regular updates are one excellent way to keep up-to-date on BNRC’s recent accomplishments and upcoming plans – all sent right to your inbox! We hope that you’ll enjoy reading our spring feature below, and, if you like what you see, you can sign up to receive them by clicking here.

What do you love most about the Berkshires?

That question came up recently on a local Facebook group I follow. People were asked to respond with pictures.

Almost immediately, the photos started coming: serene lakes, mountain vistas, rugged trails. A secret tract of forest. Deer, bears, and bees.

Do you know why we have this serenity, beauty, and ruggedness? Why the views, and the quiet… why the wildlife isn’t gone?

It’s because of you, and people like you: people who love the Berkshires and who have decided its mountains, trees, and bees are important.

People who have chosen to act with their heart, their hands, and their money, to protect what matters most.

Donate to BNRC

It’s funny, isn’t it, to measure success in what hasn’t happened?

What if together we hadn’t acted to protect Baldwin Hill in Egremont?

When you walk Baldwin Hill today, what you don’t see is development. You don’t see the collective efforts of hundreds of people like you. All you see is—beauty. Open fields. The majestic elm… Egremont’s most beloved resident!

But it IS the work, the coming together, the focusing of our time, energy, and money on what we value, that ensured that Baldwin Hill… and Undermountain Farm in Lenox… and Hollow Fields in Richmond… and hundreds of other places across the county… will stay as they are—as our generations received them.

You did that. You and folks like you can do that this spring by donating to BNRC.

Donate to BNRC

But this wasn’t meant to be a typical fundraising letter! Actually, at this point in the year, I usually write what we call a Newsyletter—filled with updates on recent accomplishments and plans for the coming seasons.

So here’s some great news:

  • Thanks to the generosity of the owners of Ice House Hill Farm, BNRC has accepted a conservation restriction on 130 acres of the farm (formerly part of the Malnati Farm). This means the farm is preserved and its scenic views are protected in perpetuity. Because of donors, BNRC has expert land conservation staff who can act on opportunities like these on a moment’s notice…
  • Speaking of a moment’s notice, last November, BNRC was contacted by Cynthia and Randolph Nelson who wanted to donate their property of 120 acres that bordered Sleepy Hollow and Dublin Roads in Richmond. Their hope was to complete the donation quickly, and thanks to folks like you, it all came together just in time for the New Year’s Day holiday. This was a new opportunity for BNRC to offer more open land for public enjoyment, deepen its commitment to ensuring that farmers have access to farmland, and help land donors achieve their conservation goals. BNRC is in the process of learning more about this parcel and how best to open it fully to the public.
  • Over at Basin Pond in Lee, I’m thrilled that BNRC’s land stewardship team is currently in the permitting phase of improving the stream crossings along the trail that lead to the pond—a place that is perfect for picnicking, birding, and writing. Getting into those improvements this year will make it easier for more of us to use the trails (the stream crossings have been a bit precarious the last few years). It will be good for the streams too, keeping the edges of those beds in shape.
  • There’s also going to be improved access at the Olivia’s Overlook reserve on Yokun Ridge South—it’s seen a sharp rise in use since the start of 2020 and is also part of the newly opened High Road segment of trails to towns, thanks to the 600+ households that donated to the project several years ago.
  • Access is about more than trails too! Folks have written to the BNRC office and shared on social media that the Spanish language trail maps for BNRC reserves that you made possible are a huge hit!
  • You’ve also helped BNRC acquire outdoor equipment like snowshoes and gear packs, to share with local outing groups such as Berkshire Family Hikes and Latinas413.
  • In 2022, there will be new trail at Thomas & Palmer in Great Barrington, designs for parking access at the forthcoming Tom Ball reserve, and lots of other work on dams, bridges, culverts… which you might not notice but you would if they didn’t get done!
  • More conservation is in the works too. All in all, there are at least ten pending conservation projects, in various stages, amounting to over 2,000 acres of Berkshire forests, fields, vistas, farms, and waters—places that will remain unspoiled… where you can notice what hasn’t happened.

A final note: I wrote earlier in this letter that you all, together, are why the Berkshires look the way they do—why so many people on Facebook were able to share images of Berkshire beauty.

But I want to single out one particular person, who painstakingly, ferociously, persistently did the work to make these conservation projects happen.

If not for BNRC’s Director of Land Conservation, Narain Schroeder, the Berkshires would look very different today.

Narain is not someone who calls attention to himself. The only reason I’m doing so now is that, after 19 years, he’s decided to conclude this chapter of his career and seek new opportunities. As he told me, his kids have left for college and beyond, and now is the right time to go. He will be deeply missed.

For Narain… for the Facebook pictures… for the bobolink and moose… for the places where we fall in love… for the conservation projects in process… for free public access to nature…

please donate this spring to provide for everything we accomplish together through BNRC. It’s great having you on the team!

Yours truly,

Rich

Jenny Hansell
President

 

Berkshire Natural Resources Council 2022 Summer & Fall Volunteer Workdays

Fall workdays posted below!

Email RSVP to Charlotte at chood@bnrc.org


AUGUST STEWARDSHIP TEAM WORKDAYS

Trail Blazing on the Hoosac Range, North Adams (4 volunteers) AT CAPACITY
Wednesday, August 17, 10:00 am – 2:30 pm  

Help future visitors enjoy this beautiful reserve by re-painting the blazes on the 3 miles of trails at the Hoosac Range Reserve. In this workday we will organize a shuttle connecting to the Hoosac Range trail via the Busby Trail in Savoy State Forest. We will hike 4.5 miles total.  

Your efforts will help future visitors easily navigate the trail. The clear markings help hikers enjoy their time outdoors without needing to worry about whether they are still headed in the right direction. 

  1. Steven Rogers
  2. David Dutra
  3. John Kidd
  4. Katherine Kidd

Thomas & Palmer Trail Construction, Great Barrington (8 volunteers) AT CAPACITY
Wednesday, August 24th, 10:00 am – 1:00 pm 

Support BNRC’s trail crew in building a new trail at this popular reserve. Due to the complexity of the project, the workday tasks will be outlined closer to the event but will include corridor clearing, light trail surface cutting, or helping to carry decking materials for a bridge.

  1. Juliana Hektor
  2. David Dutra
  3. Jane Jacobs
  4. Jane Jacobs husband
  5. Nancy King
  6. Robert Johnson
  7. Charles Dutelle
  8. Alex Ziegler

Thomas & Palmer Trail Construction, Great Barrington  (8 volunteers) AT CAPACITY
Saturday, August 27, 10:00 am – 1:00 pm  (Rescheduled from July)

Support BNRC’s trail crew in building a new trail at this popular reserve. Due to the complexity of the project the workday tasks will be outlined closer to the event but will include corridor clearing, light trail surface cutting, or helping to carry decking materials for a bridge.

  1. Juliana Hektor
  2. Sharon Siter
  3. Jeffrey Turner
  4. Scout Swonger
  5. Robert Johnson
  6. Charles Dutelle
  7. Alex Ziegler
  8. Jessica Yauri Cambi

Habitat Restoration at The Boulders, Pittsfield (15 volunteers)
Tuesday, August 30, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm 

Join us in a continued effort to remove winged eunoymus (also known as burning bush) from the Blue and Red Trails at The Boulders reserve. We will hike in approximately 3/4 mile to the worksite. Participants will use hand tools such as loppers, shovels, and handsaws.

Winged euonymus can negatively impact biodiversity in its non-native environment if left unchecked. By removing it, we are helping to restore habitat where a wide variety of plants can thrive. 

  1. Jeffrey Turner
  2. Juliana Hektor
  3. Kathleen Mosher
  4. Wendy Stebbins
  5. Kathryn Wedderburn
  6. Charlie Dutelle
  7. John Kidd
  8. Gail Parker
  9. Stephen Veilleux
  10. Alex Ziegler
  11. Open slot
  12. Open slot
  13. Open slot
  14. Open slot
  15. Open slot

SEPTEMBER STEWARDSHIP TEAM WORKDAYS

Trail Blazing on the Hoosac Range, North Adams (6 volunteers)
Tuesday, September 13th, from 12:00 pm – 4:30 pm (Rescheduled from August)

Help future visitors enjoy this beautiful reserve by re-painting the blazes on the 3 miles of trails at the Hoosac Range Reserve. In this workday, we will organize a shuttle connecting to the Hoosac Range trail via the Busby Trail in Savoy State Forest. We will hike 4.5 miles total.

Your efforts will help future visitors easily navigate the trail. The clear markings help hikers enjoy their time outdoors without needing to worry about whether they are still headed in the right direction.

  1. Susan LeBourdais
  2. David Dutra
  3. Rosemary O’Brien
  4. Tim O’Brien
  5. Open slot
  6. Open slot
  7. Open slot

Trail Blazing on the Hoosac Range, North Adams (6 volunteers)
Saturday, September 24th, 10:00 am – 1:30 pm (Rescheduled from August) 

Help future visitors enjoy this beautiful reserve by re-painting the blazes on the 3 miles of trails at the Hoosac Range Reserve. In this workday we will organize a shuttle connecting to the Hoosac Range trail via the Busby Trail in Savoy State Forest. We will hike 4.5 miles total.   

Your efforts will help future visitors easily navigate the trail. The clear markings help hikers enjoy their time outdoors without needing to worry about whether they are still headed in the right direction. 

  1. Robert Watroba
  2. Scout Swonger
  3. Open slot
  4. Open slot
  5. Open slot
  6. Open slot

Field Maintenance at Steadman Pond, Monterey/Tyringham
Wednesday, September 28, 10:00 am – 2:00 pm (12 volunteers) 

Join us in trimming back the woody debris that has grown up in the field adjacent to Steadman Pond. Using hand tools such as loppers, pruners, and hand saws participants will remove the woody growth, so the fields are fit for mowing maintenance for years to come.  

Mowing fields is a management practice that is key to maintaining early successional habitat (grasslands, old fields, shrub thickets), a habitat type that is declining across the region. These areas provide excellent food and cover for many declining grassland bird species as well as songbirds, turkey, deer, rabbit, and many other species. 


OCTOBER STEWARDSHIP WORKDAYS

Habitat Restoration at The Boulders, Pittsfield
Tuesday, October 4, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm (15 volunteers) 

Join us in an effort to remove winged euonymus (also known as burning bush) along the Blue and Red Trails at The Boulders reserve. We will hike approximately ¾ mile to the worksite. Participants will use hand tools such as loppers and handsaws.  

Winged euonymus can negatively impact biodiversity in its non-native environment if left unchecked. By removing it, we are helping to restore habitat where a wider variety of species can thrive. 


Help Bring in Bridge Material at Basin Pond
Date is TBD, but will be a weekday, likely from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm (8 volunteers)

Support BNRC’s trail crew in building new stream crossings at this popular reserve. The workday will focus on helping to carry decking materials for the bridges. Once we have a final date, we’ll notify interested participants and hope you can make it!  


2022 Volunteer Appreciation Event 

When: Friday, October 14, 4:00 pm – 6:30 pm (Drop in or stay for the whole time)
Where: Wild Acres Conservation Area, S Mountain Rd, Pittsfield, MA 01201 

Join us in celebrating the great work of BNRC volunteers! Whether you are brand new or have been volunteering for many years- we could not do it without you. 

During the Appreciation Event, we will enjoy pictures from workdays, games, drinks, and light eats under the pavilion. We will also lead a stroll to the observation tower overlooking a beautiful wetland and Mahanna Cobble. 


Corridor Clearing on the Father Loop Trail, Alford Springs, Alford
Saturday, October 22, 10:00 am – 2:30pm (10 volunteers) 

This workday will focus on clearing the trail corridor of the 4.3-mile Father Loop to prepare for the coming winter season. Participants will use hand tools such as loppers, pruners, and hand saws.  


Field Maintenance at Steepletop, New Marlborough
Saturday, October 29, 10:00 am – 1:00 pm (10 volunteers)  

This workday will focus on clearing one of the fields with a cellar hole along Edie’s Way Loop. Join us in trimming back the woody debris that has grown up in the field using hand tools such as loppers, pruners, and hand saws participants will remove the woody growth so that it is fit for mowing maintenance for years to come.  

Mowing fields is a management practice that is key to maintaining early successional habitat (grasslands, old fields, shrub thickets), a habitat type that is declining across the region. These areas provide excellent food and cover for many declining grassland bird species as well as songbirds, turkey, deer, rabbit, and many other species. 


NOVEMBER STEWARDSHIP TEAM WORKDAYS

Field Maintenance at Steepletop, New Marlborough
Thursday, November 10, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm (10 volunteers)  

This workday will focus on clearing one of the fields with a cellar hole along Edie’s Way Loop. Join us in trimming back the woody debris that has grown up in the field using hand tools such as loppers, pruners, and hand saws participants will remove the woody growth so that it is fit for mowing maintenance for years to come.  

Mowing fields is a management practice that is key to maintaining early successional habitat (grasslands, old fields, shrub thickets), a habitat type that is declining across the region. These areas provide excellent food and cover for many declining grassland bird species as well as songbirds, turkey, deer, rabbit, and many other species. 


Waterbar and Corridor Clearing Sunset Rock Loop at the Hoosac Range, North Adams
Tuesday, November 15, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm 

 This workday will focus on clearing the trail corridor and water bars of the 1.5-mile Father Loop to prepare for the coming winter season. Participants will use hand tools such as loppers, pruners, hand saws, and digging tools. 


Other Community Volunteer Opportunities:  

  • The Berkshire Environmental Action Team (BEAT) hosts a weekly invasive hardy kiwi cut and pull at Burbank Park in Pittsfield. If you’d like to volunteer with BEAT by helping us continue our efforts to eradicate this destructive and problematic vine, please send an email to Noah at noah@thebeatnews.org 

 

 

CANCELED: Floodplain Forest Walk at Housatonic Flats, Great Barrington

Saturday, July 23rd, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Housatonic Flats, Great Barrington 

Floodplains are uncommon in Massachusetts, but they offer a wealth of environmental benefits. Floodplain forests host rare plant and wildlife habitat, offer climate resiliency by storing stormwater during floods, and, of course, store carbon. Join us for a walk at BNRC’s Housatonic Flats reserve, special for its floodplain forest that sits right along the Housatonic River. We will learn about the ecosystem benefits of floodplain forests and how to identify some of the plants that specialize in growing there.  

Distance: 0.9 miles

Difficulty: Easy (little elevation gain, slow pace)

For questions or to RSVP, email Charlotte at chood@bnrc.org (up to 12 participants).

Well behaved dogs allowed on leash. 

Directions 

From Lee: From the Mass Pike/Big Y intersection, take Route 102 southwest toward Stockbridge. In Stockbridge turn left onto Route 7. After passing Monument Mountain, before reaching Price Chopper, look for the parking lot on the right side of the road. 

From Great Barrington: From the Price Chopper, head north on Route 7 for less than half a mile. Parking will be on the left. 

From Lenox: Take Route 7 or Route 7A south toward Great Barrington. After passing Monument Mountain, before reaching Price Chopper, look for the parking lot on the right side of the road. 

GPS: 42.216357, -73.343895 (Trailhead parking) 

Saying “Hi” from The High Road

May 19, 2022

Dear Reader,

The view from Yokun Seat along Yokun Ridge.

If you’ve been keeping up with BNRC, you are likely aware of the many exciting changes afoot. In addition to new staff, new conservation projects, and even a new office, you may have heard about the new Yokun Ridge trail that opened last summer.

The significance of this trail is not due solely to its natural beauty, unique ecology, and scenic vistas (although I assure you, those exist in abundance). It is also the first completed leg of The High Road, BNRC’s vision to create a more walkable, interconnected Berkshire County.

Which leads me to my originally intended purpose of addressing you, the reader: To introduce myself as BNRC’s new High Road Manager.

My first exposure to this project was back in 2017. My neighbor, who knew I had a deep interest in both land conservation and trail development, excitedly brought me a copy of a BNRC newsletter with the inaugural showcase of The High Road on its front cover. I remember eagerly opening to the booklet’s colorful centerfold and becoming enchanted by the vivid and imaginative description of a sinewy network of woodland trails, which would someday connect the many towns dotting the Berkshire’s hilly landscape.

Back then, I had no clue that my neighbor’s introduction to The High Road would culminate with me taking a managing role on the project five years later. Nor did I know that in the intervening time, I would have the good fortune to be involved in many trail initiatives, both nationwide and here in the Berkshire region. And that in those years, I would develop a deep, crystalized belief in the importance of sustainable and equitable access to nature.

And so, when presented with the opportunity to join BNRC as its High Road Manager early in 2022, I jumped at the chance.

In the initial days, weeks, and months in this role, I look forward to speaking with and getting to know many of you. Learning the significance of this momentous project and how it fits into BNRC’s mission is paramount.

As they say, Rome was not built in a day, (nor were all roads purportedly leading to it), so I suspect that this “road” won’t be, either. And that, in my opinion, is a good thing. It is my hope to honor the original spirit with which The High Road was founded, while keeping an open mind to the inevitable twists and turns any project of this magnitude is certain to take.

I’ll leave you with a favorite quote of mine from the novelist, Louis L’Amour, one that I will carry with me as I begin my work on The High Road.

“The trail is the thing, not the end of the trail. Travel too fast, and you miss all you are traveling for.”

-Deanna Oliveri, High Road Manager

Full Moon/Night Hike at Housatonic Flats, Great Barrington 

Friday, March 18, 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm  

Join us for a 1-mile beginner-level full moon hike. If weather permits, we’ll snowshoe! If you don’t have your own, we will have some pairs to loan. If there’s no snow, we’ll skip the snowshoes and go for a winter hike! 

To RSVP email Mariah at mauman@bnrc.org. 

Housatonic Flats reserve: https://www.bnrc.org/trails-and-maps/top-berkshire-trails/housatonic-flats/  

Difficulty: Easy (gentle grades, easy pace) 

What to Bring:  Bring a flashlight or headlamp. Please wear sturdy footwear (consider snowshoes and/or micro-spikes) and bring layers. BNRC has a few pairs of micro-spikes to loan.    

Directions: 

From Lee: From the Mass Pike/Big Y intersection, take Route 102 southwest toward Stockbridge. In Stockbridge turn left onto Route 7. After passing Monument Mountain, before reaching Price Chopper, look for the parking lot on the right side of the road. 

From Great Barrington: From the Price Chopper, head north on Route 7 for less than half a mile. Parking will be on the left. 

From Lenox: Take Route 7 or Route 7A south toward Great Barrington. After passing Monument Mountain, before reaching Price Chopper, look for the parking lot on the right side of the road. 

GPS: 42.216357, -73.343895 (Trailhead parking) 

Caminata Familiar Autoguiada, en The Boulders, Pittsfield

¡Camine 1.25 millas y aprenda sobre cómo ir en busca de búhos!

CUÁNDO/DÓNDE:

Luna de Búho, de Jane Yolen, estará exhibido para una aventura autoguiada desde el sábado 12 de febrero hasta el domingo 27 de febrero (desde el amanecer hasta el atardecer) en la reserva de The Boulders en Pittsfield.

DESCRIPCIÓN:

Mientras camina, disfrute de la historia de un padre que lleva a su hijo a la aventura de ir en busca de búhos por primera vez en una fría noche de invierno. Los dos compañeros caminan sin palabras, pues cuando se encuentran en busca de búhos palabras no son necesarias. Solo se necesita tener esperanza. A veces no hay búhos alrededor, pero otras veces sí los hay.  Si bien la audiencia del libro es para niños de 3 a 7 años, el contenido es ideal para todas las edades, ¡incluso para adultos!

Este evento se realiza en colaboración con el Consejo de Recursos Naturales de Berkshire y el Equipo de Acción Ambiental de Berkshire. 

Si tiene alguna pregunta, por favor, comuníquese con Mariah en mauman@bnrc.org.

INDICACCIONES:

El área de estacionamiento está a la izquierda de la casa en esta dirección: 1051 Dalton Ave, Pittsfield, MA 01201 y frente a Hubbard Avenue. Hay una escalera de piedra y un quiosco informativo que ingresa al acceso sur a The Boulders Reserve.

 

Forest Floor Discovery Hike, Clam River, Sandisfield 

Saturday, December 18, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm  

(Canceled due to weather) 

Join us for a 1.2-mile hike that will have everyone up close and personal with the forest floor. We’ll focus on identifying low-growing evergreens like American wintergreen, partridgeberry, princess pine, and more! 

To RSVP email Mariah at mauman@bnrc.org. 

Clam River reserve 

Difficulty: Easy (gentle grades, easy pace) 

What to Bring: Please bring water, wear sturdy footwear and wear layers. BNRC has a few pairs of micro-spikes to loan. 

It’s hunting season, please remember to wear your blaze orange! 

Directions: 

66 Sandisfield Rd, Sandisfield, MA 01255 

From Pittsfield: Take Route 20 East through Lee. After passing under the Mass Pike, turn right on Route 102 and then take an immediate left onto Tyringham Road. Continue straight across Route 23 onto Town Hill Road. Follow this until it intersects with Route 57 in Sandisfield. Turn left onto 57, heading east. Continue on Route 57 for 1.5 miles and park on the left at the Sandisfield Town Hall Annex, which is the former Sandisfield School. Enter the woods at the east edge of the parking lot. 

   

2021 October Enews

 

 

Guided After-School StoryWalk Event at The Boulders, Pittsfield

Wednesday, October 6, 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Join us for a 1.25 mile walk and learn how patient persistence, an inquiring mind, and creative experimentation drive scientific discovery!

Contact Mariah at mauman@bnrc.org or 413-499-0596 with any questions.

Difficulty: Easy (easy pace, little elevation changes)

StoryWalk Book: Buzzing with Questions: The Inquisitive Mind of Charles Henry Turner by Janice N. Harrington

Can spiders learn? How do ants find their way home? Can bugs see color? All of these questions buzzed endlessly in Charles Henry Turner’s mind. As the first Black entomologist, he was fascinated by plants and animals, and bugs. And even when he faced racial prejudice, Turner did not stop wondering. He constantly read, researched, and experimented. Author Janice Harrington and artist Theodore Taylor III capture the life of this scientist and educator in this nonfiction picture book, highlighting Turner’s unstoppable curiosity and his passion for science. This book is recognized as A National Science Teachers Association and Children’s Book Council Best STEM Book.

While the audience of the book is 7-10-year-olds, the content is great for all ages- even adults!

Snacks and water will be provided! Also, participants will get a copy of The Hike, a nature book for kids, by Alison Farrell.

Directions: The parking area is to the left of the house at this address: 1051 Dalton Ave, Pittsfield, MA 01201 and across from Hubbard Avenue. There is a stone staircase and informational kiosk entering the south access to The Boulders Reserve.


Did you know that you can check out a BNRC hiking backpack at the Berkshire Athenaeum, Pittsfield’s Public Library?

The backpacks are filled will all the things you need for a safe, fun, and educational outdoor adventure.

  • Magnifying Glass
  • Pair of Binoculars
  • 2 Rain Ponchos
  • First Aid Kit
  • Wildflower & Tree Guide
  • Butterfly & Moth Guide
  • Bird Guide
  • Compass
  • Bug Spray
  • Journal

Be sure to check one out for your next adventure!